NewMediaMetrics Study Shows the Power of Movies to Help Target a Brand's High-Value Consumers

on April 13, 2010
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NEW YORK - Today, the Cinema Advertising Council (CAC) industry trade association revealed findings from the 2009 "NewMediaMetrics 360 Cross Platform Study" - a study that links Emotional Attachment (EA) of consumers to brands in key categories to media across multiple media types and properties.

The value of cinema compared with other broad media platforms was illustrated in an announcement made today by Michael Chico, President and Chairman of the CAC.

The NewMediaMetrics 360 Cross Platform Study is a syndicated industry-wide study that helps marketers identify consumers who are emotionally attached to measured brands and then create the optimal strategic messaging and media mix in order to reach these targets. The 2009 study had a base of over 3,000 persons 13-54 who ranked their EA to brands and media on an 11-point scale (where 9 or 10 = "Emotionally Attached"). Media measured included television, magazines, newspapers, the Internet, radio, cinema and non-cinema out-of-home (OOH) media (including health clubs, doctors offices, billboards, bus shelters, sports arenas, etc.).

Highlights from the study include:

• 44.5 percent of Health & Beauty consumers (i.e., consumers surveyed who used products from this category within six months of the study) are emotionally attached to the movies, compared with 29.6 percent for television, 21.2 percent for radio and 20.6 percent for magazines.

• 43.9 percent of Consumer Packaged Goods & Foods category consumers are emotionally attached to the movies, compared with 28.9 percent for television, 20.5 percent for radio and19.2 percent for magazines; and

• 43.3 percent of QSR/Casual Family Dining category consumers are emotionally attached to the movies, compared with 28.4 percent for television, 20.1 percent for radio and 18.8 percent for the Internet.

Several individual brands were measured as a part of this research, in the above as well as within the Apparel, Electronics and Entertainment categories.

"The emotional attachment that consumers have to the cinema environment further emphasizes the value that marketers achieve by associating their brands with the movies" says Mr. Chico. "NewMediaMetrics' unique methodology and insight is a great tool for advertisers and agencies trying to figure out how to get the most value out of their overall media budgets."

Another key finding: the movies have a higher EA rating (41.5 percent) than watching major televised sports and entertainment events. These include the Super Bowl (39.7 percent), Summer Olympics (26.3 percent), World Series (22.8 percent), Oscars (16.1 percent) and GRAMMYs (15.1 percent).

"Over the past 10 years, Emotional Attachment has been proven to be a predictive means of measuring consumer product purchasing and media behavior by applying academic principals to marketing and media," said Gary Reisman, Principle NewMediaMetrics, Inc. "On a brand by brand basis, different media are more effective at reaching a brand's high-value targets (those targets that represent the lion's share of revenue for that brand). NMM helps marketers identify and prioritize the cross-platform media that have a high concentration of high-value prospects.

"Consumers are highly attached to the movies and they went to the cinema in record numbers in 2009. Our study shows that movies are a powerful part of the media mix and an excellent way for brands in key categories to connect with customers."

This is the CAC Research Committee's first announcement of 2010, with additional research planned for later this year. Last year, in addition to its annual revenue report, the CAC issued a study conducted by Integrated Media Measurement Inc. (IMMI) which showed that, when combining television and cinema in an ad campaign, the consumer conversion rate was more than double when compared to a television buy alone, with double the lift and increased incremental reach.

Tags: analysis, promotion, NewMediaMetrix
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