amc.pngTickets on sale now for AMC Theatres' Oscar® tradition featuring all eight Best Picture nominees; AMC partnering with Tilt to offer crowdsourced AMC locations for the 24-Hour Best Picture Showcase marathon

For the ninth straight year, AMC Theatres is bringing all of this year's Best Picture nominees to its locations for the AMC Best Picture Showcase.

Since 2007, AMC has offered guests the opportunity to see every movie nominated for Best Picture by the Academy of Motion Picture of Arts and Sciences for one great price. The traditional AMC Best Picture Showcase will take place over the course of two Saturdays-Feb.14 and Feb. 21.

Also back by popular demand this year, but with a twist, is the AMC Best Picture Showcase 24-hour Marathon, which shows every movie nominated for Best Picture in less than 24 hours, right before the Oscars®. This year, in addition to the six locations already announced, AMC has partnered with crowdfunding platform Tilt to allow guests the option to bring a Best Picture Showcase Marathon to their favorite location.

To participate, guests can visit www.AMCtheatres.com/BPS to see participating locations, and nominate their theatre for the AMC Best Picture Showcase marathon. Guests can "reserve" a ticket at that theatre, and once 100 tickets are reserved, the event is on!

AMC Stubs members will receive an additional $5 AMC Stubs Bonus Bucks added to their membership card for each one-day pass purchased, up to four tickets. Members who purchase a two-day pass or purchase a ticket to the marathon event will receive $10 AMC Stubs Bonus Bucks to their membership card. AMC Stubs Bonus Bucks can be used for concessions throughout that day.

Tickets are on sale online at amctheatres.com/bps and at the box offices of participating AMC locations. The two-day pass is available only at the box office of participating theatres. Follow the Best Picture Oscar buzz on Twitter by using the hashtag #amcbps or on Facebook at facebook.com/amctheatres.

The Academy Awards® will be presented on Sunday, Feb. 22, at the Dolby Theatre at the Hollywood & Highland Center® and televised live on ABC.

Oscar® is the registered trademark and service mark of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

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sniper.pngLOS ANGELES - January 21, 2015 - According to Fandango, the nation's leading moviegoer destination, "American Sniper" continues to stay on target, with this weekend's top ticket sales and a surefire 87 out of 100 points on Fandango's Fanticipation movie buzz indicator.

"Sniper" is on track to see landmark weekend sales, marking:

· The biggest second weekend of any January wide release in Fandango history;

· Second weekend sales that are bigger than the first weekend sales of the previous top January openers ("Lone Survivor" and "Ride Along") on Fandango.

"‘American Sniper' is unstoppable and its hot daily ticket sales show no signs of letting up," says Fandango Chief Correspondent Dave Karger. "Clint Eastwood's award-nominated film is currently on track for an historic second weekend, as it continues to smash January records."

Fandango Movieclips has compiled the most memorable scenes from Bradley Cooper's movies in "The Ultimate Bradley Cooper Supercut." The mashup video can be viewed at http://www.fandango.com/movie-trailer/bradleycoopermashup-trailer/177733?autoplay=true&mpxId=2646910007.

About Fandango's Fanticipation

Known for having its finger on the pulse of moviegoers, Fandango's movie buzz indicator, Fanticipation, provides statistical insight into the movies fans are planning to see in a given weekend. Fanticipation scores (based on a 1 to 100-point scale) are calculated via an algorithm of Fandango's advance ticket sales, website and mobile traffic, and social media engagement. Fanticipation is not intended as a forecast of the weekend box office; it is a snapshot of movie fan sentiment.

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20yearmedia.pngNew York, NY, January 20, 2015: 20 Year Media Corp, ("20 Year Media" or "20YM"), a Vancouver based digital media technology company, is pleased to announce that it has acquired the assets of Emerging Cinemas, LLC. ("Emerging Pictures " or "EP"), a pioneer in digital delivery and exhibition for the motion picture industry. Leveraging Emerging Pictures' existing network of digital cinemas and its established technology platform, 20YM will utilize its enhanced demand data and social intelligence capabilities to address the excess capacity problems of the $40 billion North American cinema business.

"Emerging Pictures was originally founded to create a more efficient way of delivering movies to theatres using digital technology. With 20 Year Media, we are now adding the next piece of the equation: using data to create more efficient and effective ways to match content to audience and screen," said Ira Deutchman, coH founder of EP.

The sales and marketing department of EP will continue to operate out of its New York office while the technology infrastructure will be overseen by the 20YM team in Vancouver, BC.

"The original Emerging Pictures technology was about removing friction on the distribution side," said Mark Rutledge, CEO of 20YM. "With our new tools, we'll be removing the friction on the marketing side by putting the data in the hands of the exhibitors and completely automating the process from booking all the way through delivery," he continued. "This new technology will give audiences a wider selection of movies, and generate higher box office returns for both theatre owners and content creators."

The upgrade to the EP technology platform will focus on creating a more flexible system that is compatible with any standard DCI configuration in theatres. The new system, to be rolled out in the fall of 2015, will enable exhibitors to be more innovative and flexible in their programming decisions using 20YM data together with seamless digital delivery.

As part of the acquisition, industry veteran Ryan Markowitz (formerly VP, Theatrical for eOne (US)) will become VP of Sales and Distribution at EP. Ryan brings a wealth of experience in the distribution and marketing of big budget and independent films. "Emerging Pictures was at the forefront of the digital delivery revolution. Our continuing mission is to bring together content providers, whether they be traditional distributors or cutting edge curators, with our exhibition partners, to maximize revenue, through a wholly digital experience," said Markowitz.

The new company will continue to work with leading distributors such as Sony Pictures Classics, IFC, Magnolia, A24, and Radius on films such as "Boyhood", "Whiplash", "Snowpiercer", "Force Majeure", and "Citizen Four". The existing EP technology can deliver to over 150 theatres across the United States, and the network is poised to grow by over 30% in 2015.

About 20 Year Media Corp. 20yearmedia.com

20 Year Media is a pioneer in demand driven inventory optimization for the motion picture industry. 20YM's technology system aggregates consumer demand and uses this data to match and deliver content across platforms, maximizing revenues for all stakeholders.

 

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Art House Convergence 2015: The Keynote Speakers

Randy Cohen, Vice President of Research and Policy, Americans for the Arts

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by Daniel Loria

Randy Cohen's tireless efforts in the fields of arts funding, research, policy, and community development have earned him plaudits from arts organizations across the country. Cohen is the editor of the National Arts Index, an annual report on the state of the arts in the United States, along with two other economic publications on the arts industry: Arts & Economic Prosperity and Creative Industries. He is no stranger to Utah in January either, having worked with Robert Redford and the Sundance Institute on developing the National Arts Policy Roundtable, an annual summit that brings together leaders who focus on the advancement of American culture. Cohen spoke with BoxOffice ahead of his keynote address at Art House Convergence.

What was the effect of the recession on non-profit arts organizations in the U.S.?

The "Great Recession" caused huge hardships for non-profits everywhere, and especially for non-profit arts organizations. They saw declining revenues, declining audiences, declining contributions...it was a really tough go and we certainly saw some thinning of the herd as well, some organizations weren't able to make the turn. Arts organizations have been a little slower coming out of the recession than the rest of the economy overall. 2012 was when the fortunes started to change for our industry. A lot of it is driven by the economy, which helps drive philanthropy and consumer confidence -if people are worried about losing jobs and houses, they hold back on things that are not necessities. That was one of the major challenges we were up against. 

What sort of factors, whether they be political economic or within a community, enable nonprofit arts organizations to thrive?

The state of the overall economy correlates with a healthier sector, but there were arts organizations even during the recession that did thrive. It's really about how well we're connecting with a community, how well we're connecting with our audiences. The research is pretty clear about how audience engagement is changing. People are looking for more active participation versus a passive kind of experience; that business model where you have an eight o'clock curtain, put on a show, and kick them out the door they came in afterwards -that's struggling in a lot of places. Some arts organizations are letting people see what's going on behind the scenes a little bit, getting more personally involved with their community. Arts organizations need to keep up with how their audiences are changing. Look at what happened to the music industry, it's been completely turned on its head -not just non-profits, of course. Over the last dozen years the number of music and CD stores in this country has dropped around 50 percent. Remember Tower Records? Gone. People haven't stopped listening to music; 45 percent of the industry revenue now comes from digital downloads. Technology is having a big effect. The National Opera went out of business about a year and a half ago in Washington D.C. -Placido Domingo was their artistic director. Are Washingtonians just not invested in opera anymore? Maybe, maybe not  -the opera folded into the Kennedy Center- but twice a year the baseball stadium hosts what's called "Opera in the Outfield" and they do a live simulcast on the big screen and it's hugely popular. You start to hear about more and more of these kind of examples and you find that the arts aren't in trouble so much, but maybe some of the traditional delivery mechanisms are.

Engaging an audience can be a huge challenge, especially for cinemas -where marketing plays such an important role. What have you seen as being effective ways to drive in community interest in the arts?

A big part of it is bringing the arts and the culture to where the people are instead of just expecting to put up a season and hoping people show up. Are there different kinds of venues? Can we bring the product closer to the people? The demographics of our communities are changing rapidly. We need to think about how well our arts organizations are connecting to the different racial and ethnic groups in our communities. Folks want to participate, folks want to engage. I think there's so much competition for the audience's time and wallet that we have to make ourselves ultra-relevant to their lives. That can mean changing with the diversity, or addressing the different segments of your community and dealing with the important issues of our communities. It's also connecting with other segments and other leaders in the community; how are our arts organizations connecting socially, educationally, and economically? An institution can't be an isolated island, you can't have an isolationist strategy because everyone will leave you alone. I always think in terms of, how do we make the arts unavoidable in our communities? And we can do that with all the art forms, and that's what engages people -when they participate and experience the arts, and then they want to get more of that. That's when the transformation takes place: when a person attends or sees something -a museum exhibit, or a play, or a film- and you walk out and think about life a little differently. The research shows that the more of those kind of experiences you have, the more you become a cultural omnivore. 

You follow and track a variety of different arts organizations. In your view, what role do cinemas play in the cultural life of a community?

Cinema is one of our fundamental components of a healthy cultural community, it's not an extra by any means. It's an art form that can be taken so many places. We're finding that people want to create personally, they don't want to just attend -they want to be a creator, too. With technology now, film is just so accessible -probably the most accessible art creation-form that's out there after pencil and paper. A lot of us have telephones, a lot of us have computers, and we can create. It makes film and cinema central to our communities because it provides a great cultural product that we can attend and be creators of. If we want to stay relevant to our communities, if we want these vibrant art-houses and cinema organizations, these are the things we need to do. When you're relevant, you have audiences and earned income, and that's also the key to contributor dollars as well. If nobody is walking through your turnstiles, good luck getting those public and private sector dollars.    

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By Daniel Garris

Warner's American Sniper took in an impressive $9.92 million on Tuesday to lead the daily box office with ease for a fifth consecutive day. The Clint Eastwood directed Best Picture nominee starring Bradley Cooper was down just 45 percent from Monday's holiday inflated performance. After five days of wide release, American Sniper has grossed a massive $120.56 million. In addition to rocketing past pre-release expectations the film is currently running 76 percent ahead of the $68.45 million five-day start of 2013's Gravity. With daily grosses of this size and impressive daily percentage holds thus far, American Sniper is obviously looking it remain in first place with ease over the upcoming weekend.

The Wedding Ringer placed in second with $1.71 million. Sony's modestly budgeted comedy starring Kevin Hart and Josh Gad was down 50 percent from Monday. The Wedding Ringer has grossed $25.75 million in five days, which is on the lower end of pre-release expectations. The film is currently running 11 percent behind the $29.00 million five-day pace of last year's About Last Night, but should continue to close the percentage gap between the two films thanks to stronger daily holds.

Fox's Taken 3 took third place with $1.13 million. The third installment of the Liam Neeson led franchise was down 52 percent from Monday and down a sharp 66 percent from last Tuesday. Taken 3 has grossed $66.97 million in twelve days. That places the film a reasonable 25 percent behind the $89.60 million twelve-day take of 2012's Taken 2.

Paddington claimed fourth place with $1.01 million. The family film from The Weinstein Company was down 85 percent from Monday, which is a sure sign of how heavily the film is skewing towards family audiences. Paddington has grossed a very solid $26.50 million in five days, which places the film essentially on par with the $26.58 million five-day start of last year's The Nut Job.

Best Picture nominees Selma and The Imitation Game took fifth and sixth place with respective daily takes of $0.89 million and $0.71 million. Paramount's Selma was down 82 percent from Monday's inflated Martin Luther King Day performance, while The Imitation Game was down just 41 percent. Respective current total grosses stand at $32.41 million for Selma and at $52.34 million for The Imitation Game.

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