ow-records.pngBy Shawn Robbins

At the risk of presumption, Avengers: Age of Ultron is about to break the domestic box office opening weekend record.  "By how much?" is an almost superfluous question when anything close to the standing record of 2012's The Avengers ($207.4 million) will and should be viewed as a massive success for Ultron.

Instead, as movie fans and the industry await a momentous beginning to Summer 2015, we decided to take a look back at the five longest- and shortest-tenured films to have carried this trophy throughout modern history.

As a disclaimer, like most records, an endless number of asterisks could be placed next to these. Inflation, 3D and premium screen surcharges, non-Friday releases, expanding theater saturation, and other factors have helped some records stand as long (or not) as they did. Nevertheless, if you're stocking up on geeky box office trivia to share with your friends as you wait in line for Age of Ultron this weekend, this is a good place to start.

A few caveats (including how a few ties were broken) can be found below the two lists. It's worth mentioning that if/when Marvel's latest flick bests its predecessor this weekend, that would end The Avengers' stint at 2 years, 11 months, and 25 days -- just outside the top five longest streaks.

Let's count this down.

The Longest

5. Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (May 1984)
Title Held: 2 years, 11 months, 27 days (broken by Beverly Hills Cop II)
Opening Weekend: $25.3 million
Adjusted for 2015 Prices: $61.2 million

The second Indiana Jones flick capitalized on the massive popularity of Raiders of the Lost Ark, plus Harrison Ford fresh off the original Star Wars trilogy's end one year prior. Where most heavyweight tentpole films open in 4,000 or more theaters today, Temple debuted in 1,687 theaters 31 years ago. Adjusting for today's ticket prices, it would have averaged nearly $36,300 per theater. That's in line with most record-breakers, including non-adjusted figures of more recent releases.

4. Batman (June 1989)
Title Held: 2 years, 11 months, 27 days (broken by Batman Returns)
Opening Weekend: $40.5 million
Adjusted for 2015 Prices: $82.8 million

Most around the age of 30 and older distinctly remember the pop culture phenom that was Tim Burton's original take on the Caped Crusader. From box office records to toy sales, Batman picked up the big screen comic book torch left behind by Richard Donner's Superman and earned $37,700 per theater when adjusting for inflation. For those wondering, the overall Batman franchise has held more opening weekend records (four in all) than any other series.

3. The Dark Knight (July 2008)
Title Held: 2 years, 11 months, 27 days (broken by Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2)
Opening Weekend: $158.4 million
Adjusted for 2015 Prices: $179.2 million

Most thought it wouldn't be possible for the Batman franchise to again capture the kind of synergy it did in 1989, but Christopher Nolan's sequel to the genre-redefining Batman Begins did just that. Most notably, Heath Ledger's untimely passing added mystique to what was already becoming his hugely buzzed-about turn as The Joker. As the widest release ever at that point (4,366 theaters), The Dark Knight helped established premium formats like IMAX as the "norm" for tentpole releases.

2. Spider-Man (May 2002)
Title Held: 4 years, 2 months, 4 days (broken by Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest)
Opening Weekend: $114.8 million
Adjusted for 2015 Prices: $160.5 million

One summer after Bryan Singer's X-Men revitalized the superhero genre, Sam Raimi delivered a pitch-perfect origin story for arguably the most enduring character in the Marvel mythos. As the first film to ever crack $100 million in its first three days, Spider-Man had a major hand in the beginning of Hollywood's comic book adaptation era.

1. The Lost World: Jurassic Park (May 1997)
Title Held: 4 years, 5 months, 24 days (broken by Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone)
Opening Weekend: $72.1 million
Adjusted for 2015 Prices: $127.6 million

Four years after Steven Spielberg conquered the global box office (again) with the 1993 classic, audiences were hungry to go back to "the park". Aside from other challengers in the years following (such as Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace, which bowed on a Wednesday instead of Friday), The Lost World was the biggest opener of its time and still lays claim to having owned that record longer than any other movie.

The Shortest

5. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (July 2011)
Title Held: 9 months, 19 days (broken by Marvel's The Avengers)
Opening Weekend: $169.2 million 
Adjusted for 2015 Prices: $173 million

The grand finale of the triumphant Harry Potter franchise went out in style, claiming the weekend title, the midnight show record ($43.5 million), and the opening day record ($91.1 million) -- the latter two of which still stand today. Despite fans having been given the published ending of the series from J.K. Rowling four summers before, fans and casual audiences alike were burning with anticipation to see how Harry's on-screen adventure would conclude.

4. Jaws 2 (June 1978)
Title Held: 6 months, 6 days (broken by Every Which Way But Loose)
Opening Weekend: $9.9 million
Adjusted for 2015 Prices: $34.2 million

If Steven Spielberg's 1975 breakout Jaws was the original template for the summer blockbuster (it also set an opening record), Jaws 2 was the template for box office rewards that sequels to summer blockbusters could reap. Opening in just 640 theaters nearly 37 years ago, Jaws 2 averaged a stunning $53,500 per screen when adjusting for today's prices.

One technicality here: the 1978 re-issue of Star Wars earned $10.2 million on its "first" weekend in July, thus earning more than Jaws 2, but we're excluding the former since it wasn't the initial run of the movie.

3. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (November 2001)
Title Held: 5 months, 17 days (broken by Spider-Man)
Opening Weekend: $90.3 million
Adjusted for 2015 Prices: $129.5 million

The Potter franchise has the "unfortunate" distinction of claiming two of the shortest record-holding times, but that doesn't detract from either of their accomplishments. In fact, Sorcerer's Stone was the film that finally trounced The Lost World's debut, impressively doing so with a November release (the first non-summer weekend record-holder since 1979's Star Trek: The Motion Picture). Between a combination of box office success and inspiration to a new generation of book readers, Potter has left an indelible mark on the world.

2. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (May 1989)
Title Held: 21 days (broken by... spoiler alert!)
Opening Weekend: $29.4 million
Adjusted for 2015 Prices: $60 million

Taking away a two-year title held by Beverly Hills Cop II, the would-be conclusion to the original Indiana Jones trilogy topped its predecessor (Temple of Doom) thanks largely to the goodwill of Spielberg, Ford, and the addition of Sean Connery as our title hero's father. The Last Crusade was the last we'd see of Indy on the big screen for 19 years, and this opening weekend literally rode off into the sunset at a high point in the franchise. However, its benchmark debut was topped a mere three weeks after release by...

1. Ghostbusters II (June 1989)
Title Held: 7 days (broken by Batman)
Opening Weekend: $29.5 million
Adjusted for 2015 Prices: $60.3 million

The summer of 1989 was massive, folks. The third Indiana Jones, Back to the Future Part II, Lethal Weapon 2, and of course, Ghostbusters II spearheaded some of the top openings that year. The latter's early success was built up by five years of waiting after the original film became the second-highest grossing movie of 1984 (just $5.5 million behind the first Beverly Hills Cop). As fate would have it, this was the summer that amazingly saw three films break the opening weekend record -- all within four weeks of each other. Ghostbusters II's tenure was the shortest of the bunch -- and of all-time -- as it was ended by the juggernaut that became Tim Burton's Batman later in the month.

Rules Used

Since daily box office numbers are sketchy prior to a certain point, we're counting by the end of the weekend for each title (not the exact day on which records were broken, which would vary by only 1 or 2 days anyway). Additionally, re-issues and expansions are excluded, while ties favor newer releases.

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apr24wknd.pngUniversal reports that Furious 7 added another $0.99 million on Wednesday, off 42 percent from the same day last week. The film's near-month-long reign atop the box office will be ending this weekend, but its domestic gross now stands at a phenomenal $323.7 million.

The Age of Adaline took in $0.87 million on Wednesday, giving the romantic drama $16.3 million through six days of release. That's about 3 percent ahead of the pace of The Longest Ride.

Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 added $0.51 million yesterday, down 46 percent from last week. The comedy sequel's 13-day total stands at $45.2 million, 34 percent behind its predecessor.

In fourth place, Ex Machina earned $0.44 million as it continues to prove itself a sleeper hit. The indie sci-fi flick's tally currently stands at $8.31 million.

Rounding out the top five, Woman In Gold pulled $0.355 million yesterday for a 32 percent drop from last Wednesday. The drama's tally now stands at $22.6 million.

Meanwhile, Little Boy took in $0.135 million yesterday in 13th place. Its six-day total is $3.24 million.

 

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PRESS RELEASE:

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The next edition of the renowned Seminar Series by the International Cinema Technology Association (ICTA) will be hosted on European grounds on the 20th and 21st of June, the weekend just before CineEurope. After a successful European kick-off in Munich in January, this time experts of all branches of the cinema industry will come together in Barcelona, to discuss and debate crucial topics concerning the cinema industry. The events' focus will be on topics such as "Immersive Audio & Motion", "IT-Infrastructures" and safety questions, "Live & Pre-recorded Entertainment" as a new source of revenue, as well as challenges of "Content Distribution" considering satellite-dependent and future solutions. Again, manufacturer presentations will alternate with technical lectures and panel discussions. This year's program is strongly tailored towards the pressing needs of European cinema owners. The evening reception holds a highlight, since for the first time two new awards will be given to celebrate outstanding European cinema screens. The Turkish CINEMApink's „Akmerkez" site in Istanbul will be awarded for its stylish and up-to-date cinemas as „new build screen of the year". Nordisk Film Biografer will receive an award for the legendary „Imperial" in Copenhagen/Denmark as „classic screen of the year". Furthermore an introduction of the newly appointed European Advisory Committee around International Vice President Thomas Rüttgers (ECCO) will be given. Oliver Pasch (Sony) and Bernard Collard (XPAND) will continue the success story and assure to live up to the growing popularity of ICTA in Europe.

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By Daniel Garris

Universal's Furious 7 grossed $1.43 million on Tuesday to continue to claim first place at the daily box office. The seventh installment of the blockbuster franchise featuring Vin Diesel, Dwayne Johnson and the late Paul Walker has led the daily box office for 25 of the past 26 days. Furious 7 was up 23 percent over Monday and down 38 percent from last Tuesday. Furious 7 has grossed a massive $322.67 million in 26 days. The film is running a very impressive 45 percent ahead of the $221.95 million 26-day take of 2013's Fast & Furious 6.

Lionsgate's The Age of Adaline held steady in second place with $1.35 million. The romantic drama starring Blake Lively was up a strong 48 percent over Monday's performance. The Age of Adaline has grossed $15.47 million in five days of release. That is on the high end of pre-release expectations and places the film 3 percent ahead of the $15.03 million five-day start of The Longest Ride earlier this month.

Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 took in $0.81 million to remain in third. Sony's modestly budgeted Kevin James led comedy sequel was up a healthy 31 percent over Monday and down 45 percent from last Tuesday. Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 continues to run in line with expectations with a solid twelve-day take of $44.66 million. That places the film 4 percent behind the $46.49 million twelve-day gross of 2011's Zookeeper.

A24's Ex Machina remained in fourth place with an estimated $0.55 million. The critically acclaimed Alex Garland directed sci-fi film increased 10 percent over Monday. Ex Machina has grossed a promising $7.87 million through 19 days of release. The film is currently running 48 percent ahead of the recent $5.32 million 19-day gross of It Follows.

Unfriended rounded out the day's unchanged top five with $0.47 million. Universal's ultra low-budget horror film was up 21 percent over Monday and down 51 percent from last Tuesday. Unfriended has grossed $25.94 million in twelve days. That places the film 29 percent behind the $36.44 million twelve-day take of last year's Ouija.

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