Virtuosity

Add Comment on August 04, 1995 by Christine James

   Russell Crowe relishes every hammy moment in his portrayal of the scenery-chewing Sid 6.7, a computerized composite of dozens of serial killers, his name an acronym for the adjectives that best describe him: Sadistic, Intelligent, Dangerous. Sid was developed as a virtual reality training device for police officers -- a program first tested out on convicts, one of whom happens to be ex-policeman Parker Barnes (Denzel Washington), who lost his badge and was sent to jail when he assassinated the murderer of his wife and daughter. When the acutely intelligent and twisted Sid concocts a way to transplant his mind into an android body, the authorities reluctantly call on Barnes' one-man army, offering him freedom in exchange for Sid's capture.

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Bushwhacked

Add Comment on August 04, 1995 by Michael Lightcap

Within this outdoor comedy's first minute, you know it's going to be sun-baking terrible, and there are 83 minutes to go before the shady relief of the closing credits. Striding down a big-city street to the tune of "Stayin' Alive" (the opening montage is lifted from "Saturday Night Fever"), looking scuzzy in his tacky '70s-hip gear and happily being a world-class boob, express delivery man Max Grabelski (Daniel Stern) might as well have schmuck, putz, imbecile et al. plastered all over his moronic puss. In rapid order, he is framed for the death of a millionaire busine...

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Jeffrey

Add Comment on August 04, 1995 by Jean Oppenheimer

   Sacriligeous, funny, imaginative and outrageous, "Jeffrey" probably won't play in Peoria. A musical comedy/romance about AIDS, the film is sure to offend a whole range of viewers; anyone who found "Priest" shocking should definitely stay away. Liberal-minded moviegoers, however, will find this a delightful romp, even considering the subject matter.    Playwright/screenwriter Paul Rudnick ("The Addams Family") has adapted his Off-Broadway hit, but the story is so visually and creatively orchestrated it's difficult to imagine it was ever confined to a stage. The characters occas...

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Unzipped

Add Comment on August 04, 1995 by Christine James

   "It's '50s cheesecake meets Eskimo fake fur," enthuses a nasal, lisping fashion designer about his latest idea. While watching "Nanook of the North" on TV, he has been inspired to create a collection based on Inuit designs, but using synthetic fibers instead of animal pelts for fear of being "stoned like a wanton heretic." Seeming to be an over-the-top parody of the fashion industry, this is actually a documentary, which follows designer Isaac Mizrahi for one year and chronicles the the trials and tribulations of making his latest collection. To watch the creative process in motion as one of the key players of this boggling industry gears up for action is potentially a fascinating study, anthropologically speaking.

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Something To Talk About

Add Comment on August 04, 1995 by Dwayne Leslie

   Grace (Julia Roberts) finds her life running at a busy pace. She works at a Southern horse farm, volunteers for the local charity league and tries to take care of her husband (Dennis Quaid) and daughter (Haley Aull). But overall her life seems happy -- until she chances to see her husband kissing another woman. When she confronts him later, he lies to her, so she seeks refuge with her sister (Kyra Sedgwick). Her "perfect world" gone, Grace must make changes if she's going to save her marriage and have her horses ready for an upcoming competition.    Despite its apparent trappings, this Spring Creek production is not a date movie.

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Phantasmagoria (CD-ROM)

Add Comment on August 01, 1995 by Ann Kwinn

Call it 45 gigabytes of gore: The seven CDs that comprise "Phantasmagoria" are numbered in blood (red silkscreen). As this program runs, one expects to see someone get stuck in the mouth with a trowel; that is, after all, what was promised. Instead, all is locked doors in a beautifully rendered haunted house.
   Game players manipulate a photo-realistic and well-endowed character, Adrienne, who with her husband has moved into an island mansion originally built, the hint book says, by a demented magician. The first two introductory videos are enjoyable but, even with the hint book and onscreen Official Hintkeeper, users might find themselves wandering with their cursor looking for action.

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Country Life

Add Comment on July 28, 1995 by Wade Major

In view of the cinema's myriad failures to reconceptualize great stage works for the screen, the mere fact that "Country Life" manages the task so admirably is cause for celebration. Chekhov purists may take a skeptical view of writer/director/actor Michael Blakemore's recasting of "Uncle Vayna" as a tale of turn-of-the-century Australian outback, but most audiences should find the spirit of this version more palatable than last year's pretentious "Vayna on 42nd Street."
   The familiar story here unfolds in the Great War's wake on an Aussie sheep farm run by Jack Dickens (John Hargreaves) and his niece Sally Voysey (Kerry Fox).

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